Insights

The Difference Between Cookie and ID Targeting

October 28, 2015

  In short, cookie targeting is about devices, while non-cookie targeting (ID targeting) is about people. Cookie Targeting The main issue with cookie targeting is it’s about devices, and most people use multiple devices per day. They likely have a separate computer for work and home, a tablet and a smartphone. Or the device could…

 

In short, cookie targeting is about devices, while non-cookie targeting (ID targeting) is about people.

Cookie Targeting

The main issue with cookie targeting is it’s about devices, and most people use multiple devices per day. They likely have a separate computer for work and home, a tablet and a smartphone. Or the device could have multiple users such as a home computer being used by four different family members. So if the family’s teenage daughter visits fashion sites, the next person to use that computer will be served ads based on her interests. The inconsistency between the device containing the cookie and the user presents a fragmented landscape for advertisers and consumers. It causes wasted ad spend and makes it difficult to measure performance or provide proper attribution.

ID Targeting

When a site has the appropriate re-targeting code, social networks like Twitter and Facebook can identify that person’s ID. That person is then served re-targeting ads the next time they’re on those social sites. And the great part is they see those ads on their desktop, smartphone, tablet, or anything other device they use social on. Google, Amazon, Apple, eBay, and Yahoo also allow for targeting based on user login information. ID targeting creates a more consistent and relevant experience for the consumer, which is important since 70% people are comfortable receiving advertising online as long as it’s relevant to them (sociomantic.com).

Will ID take over Cookie Targeting?

Eventually it will, but cookies are still widely used for advertising on desktops across a variety of digital platforms. For many, it’s the only way to reach users at all, and the pros of cookie targeting far outweigh the cons.

Bottom line: Re-targeting Works

Consumers who see re-targeted ads are 70% more likely to purchase (cmo.com). However you do it, re-targeting brings back customers who expressed interest in your brand. Build your brand preference and stay top-of-mind by displaying re-targeted ads to audiences that didn’t convert while they visit other sites.

How TV and Digital Video Work Together

  Nearly half of respondents to a BrightTalk/IAB poll conducted in March 2015 said digital video ads and TV ads were equally effective. And the share of respondents saying digital video was less effective than TV was virtually equal to the share who thought digital video was actually better. While TV maintains its audience with…

 

Nearly half of respondents to a BrightTalk/IAB poll conducted in March 2015 said digital video ads and TV ads were equally effective. And the share of respondents saying digital video was less effective than TV was virtually equal to the share who thought digital video was actually better. While TV maintains its audience with only slight erosion, digital video usage continues to grow in time spent and videos streamed. Digital is still nowhere close to the total consumption or aggregate ad revenue of traditional TV, but video and TV can still work together.

Here are the tips and suggestions from industry leaders on integrating video ads with TV (eMarketer, 2014):

  • Use video to reinforce the larger TV campaign. “We know that when we’re out with a digital video buy, there’s greater recall when our [TV] spot actually airs.” (Amy Peet, Chrysler Group)
  • Use TV for reach and digital video for frequency. “As a cross-media planner, if you’re able to sequence these two things together, you can have them both working in unison—one for reach, one for frequency. TV advertising typically raises the profile and creates a lot of impact. Then it’s supplemented by high frequency, much cheaper inventory bought through video networks, for example, or any programmatic video buy.” (Matthew Waghorn, Huge)

eMarketer_US_Digital_Video_and_TV_Viewer_Metrics_2012-2017_195470

IAB/Neilsen Online Video Study Findings:

  • The duplicated or online + TV reach is shown to be more effective on key brand effect metrics than either platform alone.
  • The sequence of exposure matters: prior exposure to an ad online enhances the impact of the TV exposure.
  • Planning and running online video first can boost how well both the online video and TV portions of a campaign work.
  • Online video ads score higher impact than TV ads on Nielsen measured metrics. Metrics are general recall, brand recall, message recall and ad likeability.
  • Shifting 15% of broadcast media spend to digital video results in a 4% increase in advertiser reach across verticals

Digital video advertising will make up nearly 12% of all digital ad spending in the US this year and is projected to grow significantly faster than search or overall display advertising for the next several years.

eMarketer_US_Digital_Video_Ad_Spending_2012-2018_169627

 

According to a study from marketingprofs.com, most digital video buyers see online video as an essential compliment to TV:

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Discrepancy Between Viewability and Online Success

  There can be significant discrepancies between viewability rate and actual on-site interaction and conversion. Take a newspaper’s website for example, although the viewability of the ad positions above the fold is generally over 70 percent, the best results for a rectangle position is far below the fold, embedded within the news articles. The ad is positioned…

 

There can be significant discrepancies between viewability rate and actual on-site interaction and conversion. Take a newspaper’s website for example, although the viewability of the ad positions above the fold is generally over 70 percent, the best results for a rectangle position is far below the fold, embedded within the news articles. The ad is positioned where readers are focused on the content with a higher time spent on page. Although this position has a viewability rate of “only” 35 percent, it outperforms on CPA by 300% for both sales and brand metrics.

What viewability rate should advertisers expect? As a whole, ad networks and exchanges have traditionally delivered lower viewability than media purchased directly from publishers. Currently, average viewability rates for display are 43% while average video viewability rates are even lower at 39%.

Viewability rate is not the same as a viewable guarantee percentage. Though 100% viewability rates are impossible to achieve, it is still possible to make sure that 100% of the impressions you pay for are viewable. This is typically called either a viewable guarantee or vCPM (viewable cost-per-thousand impressions) transaction, and it means you are able to set the requirement for the number (or percentage) of viewable impressions you want to be guaranteed, and that’s all you’ll need to pay for.

Post-viewable conversion tracking. By using viewability as a touchpoint in conversion measurement you can also get insights on whether high viewability resulted in increased on-site behavior, like quality visits (over x seconds on the website), or an interaction on the website like putting a product in the shopping basket.

DSP’s & viewability. Enrich your RTB platform with viewability data to learn and bid smarter and faster on inventory, but don’t forget to check the relation with other KPI’s, like creative interaction and on-site engagement. Various DSP’s are investing heavily in the enrichment of their platform with viewability data. Although this mostly concerns reporting at present, it will find its way into bidding algorithms and smart targeting in the near future.

Viewability & creative. Create smarter ad units by dynamically integrating viewability duration to change the creative content after x seconds. For example, you can change the visible offer after a specific viewability timeframe. Or move your call to action forward as soon as you know you are serving on a page with a low viewability duration. You can also implement this non-dynamically by bundling domains and placements with equivalent viewability durations and serve separate creatives for those groups.

Viewable impressions will cost more than served impressions. After conducting a study across 505 million impressions from nine campaigns, Rocket Fuel found that, of the inventory that could be measured, viewable ads cost 25% more than non-viewable ones. This makes sense because the remaining spots become more valuable as the total available inventory shrinks to ensure higher viewability. They believe that if all stakeholders (advertisers/agencies, ad tech companies, publishers) pitch in to solve the problem of low viewability, everyone will start to realize even higher value from this more expensive inventory pricing.

Viewability as a tool, not a goal. Use viewability as a valuable and efficient way to run smarter advertising and to provide valuable insights, but not as the only goal in itself.

Based on articles from RocketFuel and Blue Mango.

3 Ways to Not Poison the Pool

October 22, 2015

  Posted By: Chris O’Neill, VP, Business Development, Future Flow Media   Many of our clients have recently asked about how to increase the quality and reach of their re-targeting pools and marketing databases. I thought you also might be interested, so here’s my two cents on the matter: Adding new people into a marketing database or re-targeting…

 

Posted By: Chris O’Neill, VP, Business Development, Future Flow Media

 

Many of our clients have recently asked about how to increase the quality and reach of their re-targeting pools and marketing databases. I thought you also might be interested, so here’s my two cents on the matter:

Adding new people into a marketing database or re-targeting pool can be challenging – especially trying to capture the right people that match ideal customer personas. Many companies either fail to tag the most valuable web visitors into their re-targeting pool or indiscriminately tag everyone regardless of quality or interest. Other companies will buy email lists (yes, this still happens), load them into their ESP, and let the spam fly.

What are the best ways of increasing hyper-targeted audience reach and engagement?

  1. Use multi-channel re-targeting to keep the highest quality customers interested in your offers. Web site visitors who are re-targeted with display ads are 70% more likely to convert (cmo.com). The effectiveness is even higher (and still growing) on mobile devices.
  2. Email is still an amazingly effective tool to contact unreached or under-engaged audiences, IF you use the right partner with confirmed permission-based 3rd party opt-in data (no spam and no risk to your brand). 68% of consumers rate email as their number one method for staying in touch with businesses compared to just 5% via social media. (Constant Contact, 2015)
  3. Be diligent and selective with online assets, landing pages, and traffic drivers. Make sure that campaign-specific landing pages aren’t missing the re-targeting code. Segment people, wherever possible, between generic web visitors and people that show you by their actions how interested they are.

 

 

How to Enforce Accountability in Automotive Campaigns

October 21, 2015

  Posted By: Chris O’Neill, VP, Business Development, Future Flow Media   I was speaking with an automotive agency a while ago who shared a story about campaign accountability I thought others in the automotive marketing industry would want to hear. Several dealerships were introduced to a direct marketing company that claimed to have the ability…

 

Posted By: Chris O’Neill, VP, Business Development, Future Flow Media

 

I was speaking with an automotive agency a while ago who shared a story about campaign accountability I thought others in the automotive marketing industry would want to hear.

Several dealerships were introduced to a direct marketing company that claimed to have the ability to send emails to vehicle intenders in each dealer’s area. There’s nothing wrong so far – Future Flow Media provides this capability and does it very well. The problems began to mount with how this vendor executed (or didn’t) the campaign and how they handled the situation.

The first red flag was the number of email records reported to be available, sometimes nearly the entire population of the town. I doubt EVERYONE in the area had legitimately identified as an auto shopper AND legit email opt-in all at the same time. Regardless, the dealerships went ahead with testing the new advertising vendor.

Second issue was the traffic patterns on the dealership websites. Web analytics reports showed most of the “traffic” driven by the email campaigns were <1 second hits to the home page and there were no behavioral patterns showing web activity typical of real shoppers on the website. This arose suspicion about whether email campaigns had been sent out at all, or if the vendor used a bot traffic generator to fake web hits. I understand the gravity of this kind of accusation and don’t use it lightly – which could have been alleviated quickly except for the third problem.

The vendor refused to do a sales match back. This is the process of matching the postal addresses of people who bought vehicles against the postal addresses of people who were sent the email campaign. People who received the email, and bought a vehicle, would have been influenced by the email in their purchase journey. The straight refusal to have any data processed, for analysis purposes only, accomplished nothing but to aggravate the (now burned) customer and cement the suspicion of fraudulent practices on behalf of the vendor.

How can automotive marketers ensure accountability when using outside partners for conquest email campaigns?

  1. Always insist on a sales match back process. I understand that data licensing terms can sometimes require a couple of extra steps, but it’s well worth your while. If there is sensitivity from either party, remind all involved this process is for analysis purposes only. One way to eliminate the risk that data can be misappropriated by either party is to encrypt each record with MD5 (your IT guys know what this is), making the data useless for any purpose other than one-to-one comparison.
  2. Observe customer behavior patterns on the website. Does it look like the kind of activity that real people do when they browse vehicles on a dealer’s site? There will always be some who hit the home page and leave quickly, but you should at least see some window shopping and tire kicking. In addition, there are specific leading indicators in dealership website activity our market research team here at Future Flow Media have identified. Get in touch with us and we’d be happy to share this information.
  3. Only work with marketing vendors that don’t sound fishy (impossible targeting criteria, more records than people, etc) and follow all the best practices for 3rd party email campaigns. They should have 100% confirmed permission data, the distribution systems optimized for proper delivery, and reporting of the open/click rates. For more tips and specifics on what to look out for, let us know and we’ll be happy to share more details.

Winning the Micro-Moments Battle

September 29, 2015

  In a recent report, Google asked the question, “how would you describe your phone’s role in your life?” Respondents replied with phrases like  “attached to my hip,” “butler,” and “lifeline.” The device that’s always by our side is transforming the way we learn and discover new ideas. Micro-moments, as Google has named them, are…

 

In a recent report, Google asked the question, “how would you describe your phone’s role in your life?” Respondents replied with phrases like  “attached to my hip,” “butler,” and “lifeline.” The device that’s always by our side is transforming the way we learn and discover new ideas. Micro-moments, as Google has named them, are the moments when we turn to our device and take action on whatever we need or want at the time. These micro-moments are happening along the customer decision journey and brands need to anticipate them and be there with the relevant information.

Red Roof Inn realized flight cancellations were leaving 90,000 passengers stranded every day. They started tracking flight delays in real-time which triggered targeted search ads to advertise their locations close to airports. “Stranded at the airport? Come stay with us!” It was relevant information that people needed at the moment. The result was a remarkable 60% increase in bookings across non-branded search campaigns.

Mobile is driving the micro-moments phenomenon, but it extends beyond mobile to all screens, devices, and channels. An integrated mix of hyper-targeted email, mobile, and search, along with re-targeting, ensures the message reaches your ideal audience at key stages of the customer decision journey. Learn more about hyper-targeting and the most effective mix of digital media channels.

More highlights from Google’s Report:

When people use mobile search to help make a decision, they are:

  • 57% more likely to visit a store
  • 40% more likely to make a phone call
  • 51% more likely to make a purchase

Compliment existing media with mobile search:

  • 66% of smartphone users turn to their smartphones to learn more about something they saw in a TV commercial

Beat the competition:

  • 90% of smartphone users are not absolutely certain of the specific brand they want to buy when they begin looking for information online
  • 1 in 3 smartphone users has purchased from a company or brand other than the one they intended to because of information provided in the moment they needed it

See the full report from Google here.

How Research and Data Shape Your Message

September 22, 2015

  It’s not unusual to find a tourism organization, or any company really, that hasn’t paid enough attention to consumer research. And West Virginia’s Division of Tourism hadn’t focused on this in over ten years. The tourism department wanted to know more information about the type of traveler that was visiting West Virginia and the return…

 

It’s not unusual to find a tourism organization, or any company really, that hasn’t paid enough attention to consumer research. And West Virginia’s Division of Tourism hadn’t focused on this in over ten years. The tourism department wanted to know more information about the type of traveler that was visiting West Virginia and the return on investment from their advertising campaigns. First, they conducted surveys of people who had visited West Virginia in the past year to determine their perception of the state and awareness of previous advertising exposure. Second, they started tracking mobile devices currently in West Virginia and whether those same devices had been served tourism ads for that city.

The survey results showed major distinctions in the type of tourists that were visiting West Virginia. This allowed the tourism department along with their agency, Digital Relativity, to create targeted messaging to different audience segments. For example, people from Ohio wanted more family-focused activities while people from Washington DC were interested in outdoor activities and couples getaways. By adjusting the messaging to specific audiences, a targeted email campaign had a 62% conversion rate based on signups and requests for travel guides. A hyper-targeted email campaign, combined with mobile and search ads, is a powerful and integrated solution that reaches responsive audiences online. Because hyper-targeted advertising is so efficient, less money is wasted, and campaigns are more effective.

Combined with the mobile tracking data, West Virginia was able to determine that they generate $7 for every $1 spent on tourism marketing. This led to state lawmakers tripling its 2016-17 budget to $6.5 million.

“What’s most important is we’re not throwing away money,” said Amy Goodwin, West Virginia’s commissioner of tourism and deputy secretary of commerce, “especially as a state you are beholden to the people who pay taxes.”

 

This post is based on an article by Ad Age

 

 

Apple’s iOS 9 and the Mobile Ad-Blocking Dilemma

September 15, 2015

  Apple announced major product upgrades last week which included the new iPad Pro, a revamped Apple TV, and of course the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus. But it’s the software update, iOS 9 (free update avail Sept 16th) that has mobile advertisers worried. Apple is strengthening the ad-blocking technology of its mobile browser Safari in iOS 9. With Apple’s new tools, developers…

 

Apple announced major product upgrades last week which included the new iPad Pro, a revamped Apple TV, and of course the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus. But it’s the software update, iOS 9 (free update avail Sept 16th) that has mobile advertisers worried. Apple is strengthening the ad-blocking technology of its mobile browser Safari in iOS 9. With Apple’s new tools, developers can build ad-blocking apps that consumers can download to wipe out ads on mobile sites when using Safari.

Ad Blocking Isn’t New

Mobile ad-blocking is not a new phenomenon, but it is effective. Ad Age used AdBlock Mobile to cleanly remove ads from websites in Safari with no new support from Apple required. Some apps like Facebook have in-app browsers that are not affected by current ad-blockers but iOS 9 will let developers use the new Safari browser inside apps. The good news for advertisers is hardly anyone is using ad-blocking apps. The two most known apps, AdBlock Mobile and Ghostery, have not been in the top 1,500 apps in the past three months according to App Annie. However, Apple’s appeal and market share have the potential to bring ad blocking to the mainstream, drawing more attention to the topic, and making the implementation process a lot more user-friendly.

Know Where to Place Your Mobile Ads

Even if Apple’s ad-blocking on Safari works as designed on iPhones and iPads, it’s the apps where consumers spend their time. Apps account for about seven out of every eight minutes of media consumption on mobile devices (ComScore). “The vast majority of activity is occurring in apps,” said Mr. Brian Wieser, an analyst at Pivotal Research Group. About 90% of mobile content consumption happens in apps, Mr. Wieser said in a report this summer. Advertisers are already riding this trend and investing more into mobile in-apps advertising. “Marketers will spend $20.8 billion to reach consumers via mobile apps in 2015 but only $7.9 billion on mobile browsers” (eMarketer).

Cross-Channel Marketing

As mobile browsers become more friendly to ad blocking software, it places more importance on other advertising channels such as email and search. Future Flow Media aggregates all the major ad networks and exchanges so you’re never limited to a single platform or operating system. A hyper-targeted integrated cross-channel campaign using mobile, email, search, and re-targeting ensures the ads reach your audience regardless of their device and at the optimal time in the purchase journey. Read more about Hyper-Targeted Digital Advertising.

 

 

 

 

Insights Round Up: August 2015

September 1, 2015

  1. The Mobile Gap – Time spent on publishers’ mobile offerings jumped 40% in the 12 months through July and now accounts for 55% of total time spent on their properties, up from 42% two years ago. But mobile revenue isn’t nearly as high (by a long shot) creating a “mobile gap” for publishers. Mobile traffic is…

 

1. The Mobile Gap – Time spent on publishers’ mobile offerings jumped 40% in the 12 months through July and now accounts for 55% of total time spent on their properties, up from 42% two years ago. But mobile revenue isn’t nearly as high (by a long shot) creating a “mobile gap” for publishers.

2. Audience Satisfaction Read the latest post from The Satisfying Audiences Blog on inma.org where Nicki Purcell tackles the question: Is there a perfect way to measure audience satisfaction?

3. New Tourism insights from ThinkWithGoogle – Mobile devices have completely reshaped the path to purchase for the Travel/Tourism category. Is your tourism advertising reaching in-market travelers during the many moments of intent? Discover trends using Google’s new interactive tool.  

 

4. BC and Ontario invest in Tourism – During August, two of Canada’s biggest provinces just announced major funding for Travel/Tourism marketing:

Ontario is providing $1.2 million to support 13 marketing campaigns representing 8 regions across the province. Read more: Support Helps Ontario Tourism Operators Generate More Visits and Spending

British Columbia’s (BC) government announced they are investing $10.5 million into the tourism sector across 14 resort municipalities as part of the Resort Municipality Initiative which will run until 2017.  Read more: B.C. Invests $10.5 Million to Support Tourism in 14 Communities  

Insights Round Up: July 2015

July 31, 2015

  1. Talking Autos with Yahoo Highlights from the July 22nd webinar presented by Yahoo and the CMA: Digital ads are one of the most powerful channels to tap into during the purchase journey of auto buyers. 43% of intenders view digital ads again and again as they research vehicles. Digital ads are also the…

 

1. Talking Autos with Yahoo

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Highlights from the July 22nd webinar presented by Yahoo and the CMA: Digital ads are one of the most powerful channels to tap into during the purchase journey of auto buyers.

  • 43% of intenders view digital ads again and again as they research vehicles.
  • Digital ads are also the most influential medium across every phase of the research process.
  • 41% of intenders connect with digital ads in the broad research phase, and they remain the top resource for intenders as they narrow down their auto research and approach the final pre-purchase phase.

See the Yahoo Talking Autos infographic and summary for more.

Book a Test Drive with Future Flow Media and start building an automotive intender campaign with hyper targeted digital advertising.

2.  What the Top 200 U.S. Advertisers Are Doing to Spend Smarter – Big brands aren’t spending more, they’re getting more efficient. Digital advertising is providing more bang for the billions of bucks and reducing unnecessary marketing costs. “We’re shifting more advertising to digital media, search, social, video and mobile. In general, digital media delivers a higher return on investment than TV or print.” – P&G Chief Financial Officer Jon Moeller

 

3. Busy parents rely on mobile devices for back-to-school shopping – Search interest for “back to school” grew 48% last year, and it’s already up 12% this year. 50% of all this year’s shopping will be on mobile devices, and research is starting earlier than ever before. Making sure your brand has the proper SEM tools in place will be key to a successful back-to-school campaign. 

 

4.  New research from Standard Media Index: About $1.1 billion in national TV spend was rerouted to digital, of which a staggering 87%, or $960 million, was plundered from broadcast. SMI tracked agency investments over a nine-month period spanning October to June, an interval that more or less corresponds with the broadcast calendar.

 

5. Millennials are more interested in cars than their older counterparts – Car buyers born after 1980 aren’t driving differently, they’re shopping differently. Not all of them ride fixed gear bikes either, they love their cars. 76% of Millennials would give up social media for a day rather than their car. The biggest challenge facing auto marketers is the adapting the automotive purchase process to this new generation, which means focusing more on SEM and mobile hyper-targeted digital advertising. 

 

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